festivals

Summer, festivals, food and fun.

Summer, festivals, food and fun.

Japan celebrates the onset of each of the four seasons in a special way. That is why, when the rainy season ends and summer comes into its own, an endless variety of interesting activities and events opens up for you in the Land of the Rising Sun. Along with the typhoons that are beginning to sweep across the country, festivals begin in Japan in the summer, where delicious summer dishes are prepared, fireworks are lit, and people help their deceased relatives “find their way home”.
It would be impossible to list all the things that a Japanese summer can please you , but knowing absolutely everything is not so much fun. To begin with, we will tell you about some of the most interesting classes!
Matsuri.
Summer festivals are a feature of Japanese culture. It seems that in Japan, with its rich history, there is a festival for every occasion (and not that this is a bad thing). Summer festivals are held in almost every city of the country. Local residents march through the streets of the city, erecting giant shrines on their shoulders. They often do this not very sober, since the holiday usually begins with sake throughout the city. Girls dress up in festive yukata or in traditional summer dresses (浴衣), for young men there is also their own traditional summer clothing, which is called jinbei (平平). There are many traditional festival dishes and sweets waiting for you, and the night ends with performances and fireworks for everyone.
“When I lived in Tanegashima, I participated in the summer Teppo Matsuri. The early morning already found me dressed in traditional clothes and surrounded by residents of the city. Setyu (Shōchū) (焼酎) – at that time, a potato-based vodka drink grown on a local island was passed from person to person! That’s when we started our long hike. I lifted a giant heavy shrine on my shoulders along with 50 other participants of the festival. Moving through the city, we visited every local shrine where we drank seti, then walked across the river that divided the city in half, and finally returned to where we started from to start the night celebrations. From time to time, the whole procession stopped, and we turned the shrine on its side, swaying from side to side, and people clung to it at the same time from fear and joy. By the end of the evening, everyone was comfortably settled to watch the fireworks (If you want to enjoy the best events of the Japanese summer, check out our study trip “Summer in Japan”. This 4-week course combines everything that the Land of the Rising Sun usually attracts, as well as several pleasant surprises. Visit the page of our course “Summer in Japan” to find out all the details!