travels

10 most picturesque villages in the world.

10 most picturesque villages in the world.

There are many beautiful places in the world where you can meet beautiful nature or cozy and almost fabulous houses, where people themselves seem to live in a fairy tale. Traveling around the world, you can visit many beautiful places.
And when you visit ordinary rural villages, you can see how different they are from each other in different parts of the world. Not only the nature, but also the buildings themselves are unusual and not similar. Let’s look at some examples of simple picturesque villages where you can relax perfectly.

  1. Biburi, England.
    Located in west-central England, in the 19th century the village of Biburi was described by the artist William Morris as “the most beautiful village in England”. Given the fact that the whole country is famous for its peaceful rural landscapes, these words mean something. The warm honey-colored houses of the 17th century and the ancient church of St. Mary are the hallmarks of the village. And the most photographed place here is Arlington Row: a row of 14th-century stone buildings that were converted into weaving houses in the 16th century.
    How to get here: The nearest railway station is located 20 kilometers from Biburi, in Kembla. It takes 80 minutes to get to the station from Paddington Station in London, and round-trip tickets cost about $ 57. Public transport does not go directly to Biburi, but you can always take a taxi there, and in addition, hotels often organize transfers for their guests.
  2. Shirakawa-go, Japan.
    In 1995, this place was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. This Japanese village is famous for its houses with triangular roofs, built in the style of “gassho»: such buildings vaguely resemble hands folded in prayer. The roofs are tilted at an angle of 60 degrees, so that snow does not accumulate on them in winter. There aren’t many traditional houses left in the area, so Shirakawa-go has become a popular tourist destination. A little away from the village is Ogimachi Castle, which offers the most picturesque views.
    How to get here: first you need to get to the city of Takayama (4 hours by train from Tokyo; about $ 178 round trip), and then take the bus to the village ($54 round trip).
  3. Wengen, Switzerland.
    Thanks to the Alpine scenery and traditional wood-burning country houses, the village of Wengen seems to have descended from the most beautiful postcards. Time stopped here a long time ago. Even cars were banned in this area more than a hundred years ago! Tourists have chosen the village since the end of the 19th century; separately, it was sung by the writer Mary Shelley. To this day, the charming hoteliers of those times have been preserved here. Since the village is located at an altitude of 1,300 meters, in winter it turns into an attractive destination for skiers.
    How to get here: since cars are not allowed to enter Wengen, travelers park in the town of Lauterbrunen and from there take a 15-minute train ride. Wengen can also be reached by train from Interlaken in 45 minutes and 7.45 euros.
  4. Eze, France.
    The Mediterranean coast and medieval charm have made this rocky town one of the most popular destinations on the French Riviera. Because of its location, Eze has survived many invaders in its time, and its difficult history is reflected in the architecture, in which Baroque churches are interspersed with bell towers in the Genoese style. Not surprisingly, this fabulous village has become a favorite place of Walt Disney.
    How to get here: Eze is a 30-minute bus ride from Nice and a 15-minute drive from Monaco.
  5. Zaanse-Schans, the Netherlands.
    Many people say that to understand the soul of Holland, you need to go not only to frivolous Amsterdam, but also to the village of Zaanse-Schans, located not far from the capital. This open-air museum preserves the real Holland of the 17th century. Green meadows, colorful Flemish houses, wooden houses and, of course, windmills-these views are the embodiment of good old Holland. Here you can learn how to make klompas (traditional wooden shoes), cook cheese and buy Delphic painted porcelain.
    How to get here: The village is just a 20-minute drive from Amsterdam Central Station. The ticket costs 3.20 euros.
  6. Pariangan, Indonesia.
    The active Merapi volcano, which towers over this village in West Sumatra, is one of the main natural treasures of the country. Pariangan is considered the oldest – and most culturally significant – village of the Minangkabau people. There are charming gabled traditional houses, including a 300 – year-old building with rattan wicker walls, as well as a beautiful 19th-century mosque.
    How to get here: Pariangan is located about 15 kilometers from the city of Batusangkara in West Sumatra. The nearest airport connecting this place to major hubs is in Padang.K.
  7. Savoca, Italy.
    The ruins of the Fortress di Pentefur stand solemnly above Savoca, a historic Sicilian village located on a hill between the towns of Messina and Taormina, on the island’s eastern coast. This thousand-year-old settlement has become the site of the Godfather events, and fans of the famous bestseller can visit the Church of St. Lucia, where Michael Carleone was married, and then follow the route of the newlyweds straight to the Vitelly bar and refresh themselves with lemon granita. The Capuchin Monastery at the northern end of the commune, where the mummified bodies of monks rest, some of whom died in the 18th century, is also a must-visit.
    How to get here: It takes just over an hour to get here from the international airport by car. Also, Savoca is often visited by a scenic road from the popular resort town of Taormina as part of a one-day tour.
  8. Cua Van (Vietnam)
    Most of the places on this list attract travelers with cobbled streets and ancient architecture. The Vietnamese fishing village of Qua Van, however, boasts neither roads nor remarkable buildings. But the scenery around you redeems the simple architecture! Located right among the beautiful cliffs of Ha Long Bay, this village consists of colorful raft houses and many boats. It is not surprising that the main profit of local residents is fishing. All the buildings of the village sway on the waters of the bay – even the school, which the students reach by tiny boats.
    How to get here: Ha Long Bay is located about 160 kilometers from Hanoi. A six-hour bus ride to the bay will cost about $ 8 each way. A boatman can be hired at the pier in the bay to take you to the village (usually the trip costs about $ 20. As a rule, organized tours to Ha Long Bay include a visit to the village.
  9. Caleta Tortel, Chile.
    This settlement could be called ” Chilean Venice — – if, of course, in Venice, instead of magnificent palaces and stone bridges, the streets were dominated by houses on stilts and wooden pavements. The colorful houses of the village in southern Chile are built on high stilts in the traditional style of this area. They are connected by a web of staircases and bridges that stretch over rocks and swamps. Kaleta Tortel was founded in 1955 due to the development of the sawmill industry in the district. The fact that wood is the basis of the life of the whole village is also recalled by the wooden architecture, and the sweet aroma of cypress trees filling the air.
    How to get here: as in Venice, cars are prohibited in Caleta. It’s a long way to go from the nearest airport – about 130 kilometers. Parking is allowed outside the village.
  10. Sidi bou Said, Tunisia.
    Here, wherever you look, you will see the most beautiful blue and white colors. All the buildings of this cliff-top village in northern Tunisia are painted snow-white and decorated with doors, shutters and carvings in sky-blue; the background of all this beauty is the blue of the Gulf of Tunis. This village is sometimes called the “Tunisian Montmartre”: at one time it was often visited by famous artists and writers. The bohemian atmosphere has been preserved to this day: here and there on the narrow stone alleys there are art shops, galleries and creatively designed cafes.

How to get here: Sidi bou Said is located 20 kilometers from the capital of Tunisia. You can get to it either by train (about $ 3 for a round trip), or as part of a day trip.